The history of Charleston’s Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church is a history of activism, resistance, community, and perseverance. Like other notable African American churches in Charleston, Emanuel AME, founded in 1816 by a group of…

Church communities have been a cornerstone in Charleston’s Black community for decades, serving as a sacred space for political organizing, community building, education, and spiritual nourishment. Historically, Charleston has been a majority Black…

The S.H. Kress building was built in 1931 by the S.H. Kress chain of variety stores. The Art Deco building had an innovative system for bringing supplies from the third floor to the storeroom with a dumbwaiter as well as a lunch counter.…

The Denmark Vesey house, located at 56 Bull street, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and even features a physical marker that states the historic value of the site. The designation of this site enables the city of Charleston to…

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was originally founded in 1909.  Through its quarterly magazine The Crisis, this organization pursued a civil rights agenda that included, organizing labor campaigns and hosting…

When Anglicanism was made the official religion of the Carolina Colony in 1703, only one parish was established in the city of Charleston: St. Philip’s. Less than fifty years later, the building became too small to adequately serve the numbers…

As the longest continually publishing newspaper in the South, the Post and Courier has offered well-respected journalism both within and outside of the Lowcountry for centuries, and continues to do so to this very day. Throughout much of the…

The Old and Exchange and Provost Dungeon at 122 East Bay Street was built in 1771 as a customs house for the city of Charles Town. Built on top of the location of the former Watch House and part of the Half-Moon Battery of the old city walls, it…

The former home that now stands on the College of Charleston campus at 2 Green Way, beside St. Philip Street, is known as the Martindale-Bell House or the Johnson House. This former residence is significant within the realm of African American…